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20131202
20131210
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into treatment in the first place. there is 4 l's, liver, livelihood, lover or the law. those 4 things. liver, livelihood, lover and law. within those l's is when somebody shows up in my door, someone suffering, a family member suffering who brings somebody in. when it company ms to treat we know there is different types of treatment, there is evidence base treatment. there is good evidence for it, we do it. there is evidence free treatment, there is no evidence whatsoever and there is evidence proof treatment. one of those evidence proof treatment is incarceration treatment. there was an office inspection in general report and eventually matt case became supervisor for it. i have been involved in other places. treatment in custody doesn't work. flash incarceration does not work. as far as the treatment that do work for alcoholism, alcoholism is a chronic disease like diabetes. hypertension and emphysema. when we look at outcomes for chronic disease, a landmark study for the journal medical association in 1999, showed that results for treatments were no worse or better than any other chronic
our streets our parks or vehicle code the way we build offices this year so many laws public safety and others that it compacts so to post this on the get hub and to allow get hub to be our way in which people what navigate to break it down to make t it usedable by other coders it's kind of like sailing we have had to learn with taking was and to have that on the screen in front of us and how we, in fact, our waters is exactly how get hub z is doing it. where your code is able to be found at mayor's office of civic innovation dot get hub dot l o slash open law. i'm excited to see what gets build and shared. and, of course, we're working with the open law project it's guided us to this kickoff. i'm excited to see something that's been to bureaucratic. by the way, i'm a lawyer my background i used to cause a lot of trouble in the city by you used to explain to a lot of bilingual folks in the city what their rights are. when i did the retina strict i had to explain to elderly people who only spoke chinese to help them exercise the law. that's one small example how a whole set of laws c
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight more. i never gate gave up my fate. my hope is restored. >> with that i would like to thank all of our panelist. thank you. [ applause ] and we are now going to move to our second panel. while they take their seats, this idea of forced treatment versus constitutional rights has always been a tension that we've had in our criminal justice system. there is an issue that came up earlier this year that you may have read about involving this implementation of a court that was supposed to treat individuals who were suffering from long-term alcoholism. and the court was set up in a way where individuals were not being arrested for a crime but instead were being jailed for contempt of court as long as 120-150 days in jail. my office, when we learned of this, we were not in
graduated from georgetown university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime yet he was still convicted based on the false testimony of a single neighbor. he was sentence to life behind bars. in prison mr. colwell contacted the center for help and located two witnesses who saw the murder and said mr. colwell was not involved in anyway. they located the real killer who confessed and he comm
which he fought for so long in the justice. the decision was law of the land. equal justice under law. >> when a supreme court decided the gideon case, they really brought light to that phrase. it doesn't matter if you are rich, it doesn't matter if you are poor, you get the same equal chance. >> just look at what happened to gideon. the supreme court didn't set gideon free but it gave him a fair trial with a competent attorney. >> not guilty. >> clarence earl gideon was a free man. the man who won a landmark supreme court case went to live a normal living with a job pumping gas. >> when i read where it says equal justice under law, i'm very inspired by that. i'm very comforted by that. but i know a lot of people are treated unfairly. i see it as something encouraging but i don't see it yet. >> it's written into constitution and established into the goal for society to reach for and live up to. people will fall short, rights can be ignored or even trampled. with nothing more than a pencil and knowledge. >> if you know your rights you can protect your rights. if you don't know your r
. then because we have no money, we reach out to the local bar. law firms like jim's law firm or chris's law firm help us in situations where we are trying to establish counsel and reinforce. we get over a thousand cases a year. from that first request we are usually able to take it down to about half. many of them who are writing to us are not claiming to be innocent. they are probably claiming that their prison conditions are inadequate and they are probably right. they might be claiming that they haven't received their medication, they are probably right. they are probably -- they often complaining that they were overcharged and over sentence. they probably right. we refer them as much as we can to those that might be able to help them. from then we begin the triage process to see if there is any kind of assistance once we investigate and if we are able to litigate it. >> thank you. next i would like to ask jim, poor people who are accused of a crime have a right to a public defender but most of the cases are in civil court, child custody, workers right, compensation for catastrophic injuries
and it came to a surface in the bail reform act of 1984, the federal law, the birth of preventative detention which one thought was clearly unconstitutional and then became a public good that changed the whole view of a system. now we live in a justice preemptive justice, but they will commit other crimes in the future. i would say if we all now agree or at least many of us agree with justice kennedy that the result has been a prison system that is barbaric that doesn't belong in a civilized society and serious atonement and i think you would recognize in the california prisons to meet that. let me say why it's a risk. it's always so reasonable to see risk as a way on out of these. i don't think i need to remind those in the room that an entire population were incarcerated for risk. nobody was held accountable for it either. if you look at the way this is a risk, you see racial class is at the end of the day the right kind of community ties and is risk reduction. professor simon, let me ask a follow-up. i want to get an idea of what a system you are advocating would look like. let's say you
the law - by the way, who remembers what soap is. many websites replaced the website with some kind of black and white frame. we feel we really have a model of activity we should - i'm going to tell everybody that 1, 2, and 3 to support the immigration reform. we're going to have access or the chances of services like voices 1, 2, and 3 is going to be much lower. i want to see the business owners follow suit. by the way, my wife and daughter are here and my daughter has the march t-shirt >> thank you for the practical steps and again, we have folks that are tweeting or posting there's so many ways to engage and it's easy and effective. it also means meeting people. we'll be taking another small group of ceos from small business by also start ups. in washington d.c. they only hate you when your successful. then we're going to open it up to the audience. as - >> we work with people all over the united states. we have an intelligent to do that we're suppliers there and we get to them and explain the how and why and what to do. and that's another way to leverage our networks and our s
into the firms and no non-manufacturing companies and get good jobs. we decided we, you know, would send a sister-in-law that somehow the united states would generate the idea and produce all in china. in response other parts of the midwest large managing or merchandising companies and northeast ohio you saw philosophical in business and other global dynamics they're seeking substantially job growth are to the benefit of not just the kids of ph.d. from stanford or mit but a whole bunch of folks coming out of high schools and colleges with technical prosecutors. >> tests map silicon valley it's great with ideas they didn't get made in china but it's great if you're an engineer or not so great if you're a generate but mayor lee how this model stacks up in terms of the collaboration. >> this would be returning the stats all the time about 17 or 18 percent of the economy so sun valley is reilly coming off of intense managing. the cooler than in the united states is this the the facebook and google realty but it's much more sophisticated. so we willing have the board come here and my recollection so evident
and down the east coast. i went to undergrad at duke university and law school at harvard. after clerking for a judge, i came out here and have been in here for the last 14 years. i always assumed i would go back to the philadelphia area because that is where my family is, but i was always interested in sanford cisco in terms of the city, culture, the amazing lgbt community -- i was always interested in san francisco. i am an attorney. i started off in private practice, doing complex litigation. in 2002, i moved to the san francisco city attorney's office, where our work on the trial team, doing trials for the city and doing my own cases and supervising a team of attorneys as well. another huge issue confronting the city is the deferred maintenance on our infrastructure. we have a lot of infrastructure that has been deteriorating because we have not maintained it properly, from our roads to our sewer system to muni. we need to be much more diligent about maintaining our infrastructure. i have been interested in politics since i was a kid. i have worked on campaigns since i was a teenager.
in city hall we are enacting policies, laws and legislation that move the city forward as a whole. these are the neighborhoods i grew up in, so for me it is fun to be in them to really understand what is going on and be able it fundamentals some of the thinking and some of the people that are making decisions. >> right here we played football. flag football right here every year. we hung out right in the gym. directors looked after us. parents used to check in but not only one parent, they checked on all the kids. that is what is great about this district, the community. the family base of everything. >> exactly. and look how you turned out. you are doing ok. >> doing all right. two local city guys. >> there you go. >> i get really concerned one ip -- hear people say the payroll tax is a job killer. maybe in some industries the payroll tax might be a disincentive on business going forward, but i would not be surprised if we came out of the whole discussion about remaking our tax for next year that it involves a combination of a payroll tax, commercial occupancy tax, and gross rece
church and it was mitigated by passing a law that they could only go 3 miles per hour. now they don't really keep to that, but it really did slowing down the train really did help with the sound. and if you eliminate that one stop that is in the middle, they will be going around behind those -- there is no reason to slow down, even, as much as what they do. that is it. thank you. >> thank you so much. next speaker >> [ reading speakers' names ] >> good afternoon. >> i'm theresa oberzer. the elimination of the stop on liberty is what i was going to speak on. i think it would create inconvenience for many of the neighbors, many who are elderly as has already been mentioned. their mobility is limited and the nearest stop is two blocks away. it's really deceptive because of the way that the hills are cut. it look like the stop that would be eliminated -- next one look like it's only a block away, if you go through the cut, but actually you are not to walk through the cut. it's not designed for pediatrician access, but you are supposed to go down the hill, up a very steep hill and
in common being from berkley. it's great to see people coming together after law but it's good to see maybe there's life for me. but i'm happy to be here and join nancy pelosi and congratulating he yemen they're new home. yelp is special they're starting here and staying here that i i love coming here it is now 8 hundred the numbers changed. i visited a few weeks we looked at the building restroom for a thousand. i want to join leader pelosi it is a happy day. i love to see companies succeed and the collaborating and sharing ideas this is what yelp has done. and then to do something special in the what happened in san francisco because companies that are here and start here they follow in the tradition like the charles swabbings and the fisher's and the hell man's they discover the resources and want others to grow with them. that's why to recognize 3 outstanding nonprofits you've columbian but even if company like yelp now, it's yelp and yelp foundation. i love that because i got it, it's sales force and sales force foundation the technology companies are taking up that social responsibili
and a grandfather and our son-in-law. we're proud of that, too. he's part of a very special part of our family and i wanted to go ahead and see his bio video. >> ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ many years of singing and come to the programs and come to our next event and seeing the generations at different avenues whether it's educational goals whether it's them receiving long-term housing or whether they're getting healthier i see the next generation of children and grandchildren going ton to their future and having that leads to childcare and providing a solid foundation not only for the peers but for the community as well. and providing family support. it's been collaborative community members it doesn't just take one organization to heal a community but the whole community at large to provide quality services and help the healing in this community. medical examiner indians we're born about how far and sacred it's all the influences that help us. and all we're doing it rekindling that national state my having them flush at their full potential and this community is on its way for you san francisco sustaining
to the financial statements and made this available to us and have told us about any non-compliance with laws, rules and regulations, et cetera. with that, that is my report. as we said, we conducted a successful, clean audit. and any questions that you may have on our process, findings, et cetera? >> thank you very much, miss rose, appreciate it. this is not an action item, this is informational, is that right? >> yes. >> thank you very much. >> great work. >> item 16, discussion and vote as to whether to conduct a closed session. >> motion. >> second. >> all those in favor, signify by saying aye? >> aye. >> director lee has to leave in about 15 minutes,
in the last congress when later closing was speaker of the house. she had had 16 tax cuts signed into law to help small businesses grow and thrive. as we know, during the last 15 years, small businesses account for about 2/3 of the job growth in our country, but when the bush recession hits in 2009, 2010, small businesses were hit particularly hard. small businesses are the center of her agenda. congress under her leadership gave 27 million small businesses tax cuts. two main pieces of legislation -- the small businesses jobs act in the information you have, will create a total of 500,000 jobs and create eight tax cuts. they are all described in the packet you have. also, unleashing up to $300 billion in credit for small businesses to access. there are another eight tax cuts that were passed through a number of different laws. some of our panelists will address those. even though now we are in an environment where there is a republican majority in the house and a slimmer majority in the senate, please note that the leader and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart
on my door and tell me it wasn't safe >> there are very few retrofitted laws. you have to make brick buildings saver. >> you have to reduce the risk of life lost. >> so the brick building standard is a low standard. it was to prevent catastrophic collapse. the brick buildings, we have 1800 of them. most have been upgraded to prevent catastrophic deaths. it's the lowest possible >> and they might need to be torn john. by the way, this was lori johnson. this is our risk analysis and has done work to reconstruction especiallily in kobe and post katrina. >> thanks for joining us >> you are going to be coming to the caps meeting. >> i am on the advisory committee. >> most of san francisco of densely built and not very tall. >> what is the relationship of hazard between large buildings and the typical san francisco low rise? >> most large buildings are structural steel buildings and they do well in earthquakes. there's a class there were popular in the 50's and 60's, there's a lot of apartment buildings, about 10 or 15 story tall. they are the worst class to be in. those midrise buildings
really bad from anybody's prospective is the immigration law. that's the only thing we need to tweak. thank you very much >> alexander thank you. we're going to move on. >> my immigration story is similar to a lot of entrepreneurs. i came to the united states to pursue a masters in technology. i love my experience being part of the education system and getting a masters and learning from people who were innovating things themselves and teaching students how to do. being able to be there and being able to be a part of this is incredible. i moved to the valley area to an internship here. my very first job was a start up. trying to take an idea it was so inspiring. being able to experience that desired me to start my own business. i came over on the student visa and working for different employers i was tied to the employer who was definitely very limiting. the process take a long time. but finally, i was able to get a gastrocard and start my own business. that's important and being able to be a part of this in this debate on immigration reform is critical. personally immigration refor
is generateing the political will for the reform. when the politicians some law & order politician goes on and on with this lock em up mentality and people nod their heads. if people are better educated about these issues they will call the people on the carpet and say wait a minute. i think the mission, if i can give you that, would be to step outside your circle, your work circle and bring this issue to the broader public so they can create a change in the culture and the public's response to these issues that will then enable the politicians and legislators to make the reforms to the finances and the court's etc that really need to happen and one way i think is a good way to do that and i'm talking, i'm a journalist, an advocacy journalist, it's usually said with a sneer but i wear the badge proudly, to reach out to reporter's because of course they do have that soapbox to share these stories with. so reach out to reporter's in your local newspapers, crime reporter's, whoever, and just invite them to spend the day with you. invite them to spend a day looking at just a day in your lif
between federal and state law on that, strong beliefs that people have about it, we make a pledge that we will look at every loan to make sure there is positive community impact. i think that is at least controversial enough to choose not to do it. we have not had a request yet, so i have not had to rule on that. >> we have a question in the back. >> i wanted to ask wells fargo, what is your interest rate on a loan? >> 6%. 2.75% over prime. >> ok. the second question, is a line of credit like a payroll advancement? i am a small business. just recently got contracts in san francisco. as you say, they pay slow. i want to get a loan for $50,000, but i do not want to pay the interest. i would like to get a payroll advancement where the money is available to me, should i needed for payroll. if i should need it, i can get that money. when the city pays me back, i pay them back, but that line of credit is still there. is that what they line of credit is? >> yes, ma'am. as you have a need for something to pay -- in this case, your bills -- before you get your invoices paid, that you would be able
so blessed that you asked me to take on this challenge after i left my job in law enforcement. i will be forever grateful to you for your leadership and really just bringing an end to my career in city life that has really just touched my heart in ways that i can't even express to you. so thank you so very much. i need to acknowledge -- a person is only as good as team that they surround themselves with and i would like to acknowledge my managers, because quite frankly they do the lion's share of the work and i have been blessed to hire three of them under my tenure here, and the fourth came along when i first came here and he is just remarkable. so i would like to introduce chris, who is the manager. sammy, our director of enforcement. [ applause ] scarlet lamb, manager of emergency preparedness and sue, who is the manager of m tap, the muni transit assistance program. [ applause ] the other folks i want to acknowledge are the folks that really do the job every single day, our front line staff that are our fare inspectors, our pcos. i can't say enough of the job that they do
are driven to online shopping. couple this with the fact that a year or so ago our city fathers passed a law that required -- not permits, but requires vendors in the city to collect $0.10 a bag. >> thank you. >> daniella kirshbaum [ reading speakers' names ] >> next speaker, please. >> daniella kirshbaum, good afternoon. >> good afternoon. i am daniella kirschbaum. they came before a joint committee of the board of supervisors and they spoke to them in favor of a trolley line that would run along pacific up to the top of the notoriously steep divisadero street hill and according to the article, these citizens said, "they were tired of walking, having been without streetcar accommodations since the fire." and believed that they should be given relief. so their permit was granted, but of course, with the 3 jackson, that trolley line along pacific, that trolley line did not last and of course in the 1950s, with the elimination of the cable car, the california line was stopped at van ness. and in 1982 the 55 sacramento line was eliminated and we have had the elimination of -- or parti
have laws in the books like the digital millennium copy right act that says it 's illegal to discuss venerabilities in computers if in so doing you'll make it easier to pirate movies and music, and what that means is if you discover something that makes the owner venerable and revealing that problem might make it easier to save a movie to a hard drive after it's been streamed to you, you have to think twice about it. that's a bad idea. major security venerabilities have been delayed in coming to light because the researchers were afraid. one case sony ended up infecting an estimating 300,000 military networks before it was disclosed /pwa*euz d because the people who discovered it were afraid they'd be busted by the dmca. we have governments now including the government trafficking in venerabilities the computers. we talked about your daughter's discovery and she disclosed it to apple. you say to apple, we're telling you about this venerability, you have so many days to fix it and after that period we're telling everyone about it and that way they're incentivized to fix it, we've do
at a slow rate of speed. i think i heard 3 miles per hour is the law. we calculated the risk that it doesn't come around the corner at that speed and the operator comes around the corner and there is a child or a cat -- i'm a cat lover -- if you are not familiar with the liberty stop it's a right-of-way stop, that means that the right-of-way is the train coming and it's definitely not something smaller in front of that. calculate the risk of that train coming around the corner and hitting that object? also commonsense dictates that the shortest sense from point a to b, a being liberty stop and b being 21st on one side and dolores park on the other is the right-of-way. the right-of-way in this case is a walled off area where there is not enough room for pedestrians. >> scott wickey. i'm speaking to address the proposal for the change for the 35 eureka bus line on diamond street. of course you heard a lot of public comment today about elimination of routes, and for example, in the 3. the proposed change for the 35 eureka and in my neighborhood actually doubled up service. there is nothi
that as a matter of law puts them in absurd, comical positions. i see you have the sign. >> i thought if you kept the sign with you while we're have the interview, we'd know you were telling the truth. i added a little bit to the librarian one, which is what i thought the -- >> yeah, you left out the cia, although most of them are on furlough so they're unlikely to turn out. >> well, you know, i think i've read in the new york times that they said that you were really good at delivering subversive content to youth and i have a feeling that's why the librarians really like you and gave you this award because it seems like they're a very subversive group. >> i think so. i mean, librarians, it's funny -- i talk at a lot of library conferences and one thing i say to them is i think they underestimate the extent to which they have a great deal of moral authority. even in these crazed times of characterizing everybody who does public service or people who work in public service as a parasite who wants to get rich off the taxpayer, nobody says you got involved with ply libraries to make fat bank. there
for family members. precut plastic with duct tape. there should be a law. have your disaster kit in that room, have snacks available for kids. turn off the hvac, heating, ventilation air conditioning units because you don't want to be blowing in or sucking in the vapor cloud outside. fireplace, close the dampers and seal off your shelter in place room by using duct tape and terms of the emergency alert system. listen to the radio. that's it. do not try to call the school, try to pick up your children because do you want to leave the area? no, you want to shelter in place. people own pets. do not risk your safety for pets. in summary, it is likely you are at an incident that may be involved with bnice, your safety is the most important. limit your time, get your distance away from that and some type of shielding and listen to the emergency alert system, your radio. . >> there's an acronym that we use to use an extinguisher. what's that acronym? we're going to take turns putting out this fire. you can see that it will make a pretty big mess but at least it put out the fire in your house or some
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)